Katie said, “You’re the Painter.”

Video

There are certain people in the world who have the knack for inspiring me to be a better person (and I use the term BETTER as it expresses itself in humility, kindness, empathy and plain hard work and creativity) and one of those people, for me, has been Katie Ohe.  I don’t know that she knows that she has that influence with me, but this is how some one who is truly remarkable can be laying down seeds in other people’s hearts.

I’ve written about her a few times.

In 2013, I wrote about the objects that live in Katie and Harry’s home.

In 2017, I wrote about KOAC and the experience of a studio tour, led by my creative friend, Wendy Lees.

And also, in 2013, I looked for a way to process my connection with Katie through a poem.  You see, she had taken some time, in the light of her kitchen window, to leaf through the pages of her sketchbook with me, and to talk about the experience of having ‘painter’s block’.  She spoke with me about painting.  She asked me, with all sincerity, about me.  I felt affirmed.  I felt filled.

A few weeks ago, I knew that the exhibit of Katie’s work at the Esker Foundation, was drawing closer.  As would be the case, I thought that Katie might be surrounded by many people…important people…at the opening. I couldn’t imagine myself getting anywhere near her. When I saw that the Herringer Kiss Gallery was hosting an exhibit of early works by both Katie Ohe and Harry Kiyooka, I thought that I would take the chance to visit her at that opening, so that I might make contact and wish her blessings for the big event.

It turns out that I had a lovely chat with both Katie and Harry in the peace of the gallery.  She looked into my face and her eyes looked that remarkable blue and as she held one of my hands in both of hers, she said, “You are the painter.”

These words were/are transformative words.  I am changed in the way that I think of myself, in the way that I feel and in the way that I am processing the events of my life, even the simple every day events.  I can’t explain it.

Included here, a few of the images from the opening at the Esker Foundation.  I got no where near Katie.  It was such a mighty celebration of her art and her life, I felt it was just marvelous to witness her with friends, former students, well-wishers.  As I was negotiating my way from the bar and past the steps to the nest, at one point, she looked up and literally our gazes met in the big hubbub and we smiled at one another.  That was enough.

(I know…i sound like a blithering goofball here, but, Katie is a hero for me, as she is for so many others.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where are you David Carlin?

I painted on a Masonite board while in Mr. Carlin’s class…I still have the original sketches for the painting, “Adam”, that I worked on independently through his grade nine class in 1969.  They were tucked away in my portfolio.  The oil painting has long since disappeared; likely on one of our military moves it didn’t make it onto a truck.  A muscular Adam had his leg wound up tight by a serpent…a very symbolic piece for such a young girl.  It makes me smile today, to remember.

P1120999 P1130001 P1130002It wasn’t long ago that I re-connected with ‘Mr.’ Carlin (amazing how we find difficulty attaching first names to our forever-teachers) through social media and was very excited to acquire one of his amazing pieces, ‘Jester Trickster’, through a 2011 exhibit/fund raiser where he sold his collection in order to generously support his daughter, Sarah, in a new treatment protocol offered in Albany, New York.

Jester Trickster 30 x 22 mixed media

Jester Trickster 30 x 22 mixed media

Mr. Carlin was such an inspiring mentor!  I will never forget him and his ways.  Particularly, I will always remember his sense of humour!  He was so encouraging.  As I journey back in blog-time to the visit with Dad in Ontario (wanted to blog away the poignant moments that held so many lessons while home…but Dad’s computer was too darned slow at the time!), I find myself remembering the decision to miss my 40th high school reunion in Great Falls, Montana and focus, instead, on what it was my Dad and I had to learn together through our grief.  That didn’t mean there weren’t going to be a couple of side trips though.  The trip to Hamilton had been such a blessing later in June.

I knew that my sister was a health nurse at Camp Tawingo again this past summer.  One of the joyful memories of my life was the magic of bumping into Val some years ago at a hotel parking lot in North Bay.  I was on my fourth night of driving east, pulling in from Thunder Bay and she was having her 48 hour break from camp.  It was a fortunate and very serendipitous moment.

a-huge-surprise Why not repeat it?  We decided to combine the opportunity to enjoy an exhibit, Intransit, of David Carlin’s new works with a reunion at the same Super 8 Hotel.  It was a dream to step into the Alex Dufresne Gallery in Callander and have the art work sing out the way it did.  It was spectacular, as was the feeling of excitement that was going on inside me.

As I signed the guest book, Mr. Carlin stepped up behind me, recognizing me immediately.  What a spark of magic that was!  I will never forget it…A drum ceremony opened the event and I felt washed over by good will and creativity.  It was an event I will not soon forget.  It was very quick…very spontaneous…but I needed Mr. Carlin to know that I have never forgotten him.  I also needed to see his work up close.  If ever my readers have the chance to see his art, please do!  Thank you, dear Mr. Carlin, for having been my teacher.

P1110660 P1110662 P1110663 P1110664 P1110665 P1110666PLEASE read this interview for a true sense of who David Carlin is!

Photo Credit: Carol Pretty Drum Circle Opening

Photo Credit: Carol Pretty 

Photo Credit: Carol Pretty Drum Circle Opening

Photo Credit: Carol Pretty Drum Circle Opening

Bev Tosh

 

One Way Passage by Bev Tosh Exhibit: Invermere, B.C.

One Way Passage by Bev Tosh Exhibit: Invermere, B.C.

The work and the heart of artist, Bev Tosh, will fill you up to the brim!  It is an amazing act of love that she is exploring the common story of so many women!  I am proud of her for her commitment to this project. I hope that my readers have opportunity to enjoy Bev’s work.