Scenic Driving Again and Again

Morning saw us eating a hearty breakfast, chatting it up with some of the folk at the Elkhorn Hot Springs and sitting for buddy photos on the porch swing before heading it out for Wise River and the return of our sifting screen (is that what they call it?), so that it could be sent on up to Wisdom and returned to Big Hole.

Scenic Drives Montana

Ramona and Kath Elkhorn

Sunshine’s Photo. Included here, a local resident’s beagle.

We drove separately, into Anaconda…stopping at the beautiful places along the way. The first stop was overlooking the Grasshopper Valley and enjoying the wild growth of purple Lupins.

IMG_0840

IMG_0843

Yes! Of course we did this! Two ladies who get tremendously excited by natural beauty! We had to celebrate it! We snapped photographs of one another. For those of you who don’t know…Ramona and I shared life at CMRussell High School in Great Falls, Montana 1971-1973. THEN!

Ramona

NOW!!

IMG_0846

IMG_0849

Stopped, hoping to get better colour shots of the Camas in morning light.

IMG_0852

IMG_0855

Real evidence of glacial work on the landscape. Very cool. Mt. Haggin Scenic Drive.

IMG_0856

At least 300 head of cattle were being wrangled up the highway…Ramona is in the car ahead of me, snapping away. A bull tried, unsuccessfully, to mount a cow directly in front of my car…I rolled up the window, at her refusal and then he slid his horns along the drivers side window and my car, in some sort of snorting frustration. This was an experience! Wonderful to see the worn and muddied border collie in the rear, with the cowboys. They tipped their hats and I felt that I had enjoyed a truly western experience. lol

IMG_0861

IMG_0864

IMG_0865

IMG_0867

Just as we started back on our way…these two entered the frame.

IMG_0870

Mount Haggin area.

IMG_0872

IMG_0873

IMG_0874

IMG_0875

IMG_0876

Anaconda…the stack…we pulled into a grocery store parking lot and jumped into one vehicle. Off we headed for Lost Creek.

IMG_0878

Sharing a Garden Walk With Mom and Dad

My parents have everything to do with my love for gardening. While I’ve only ever had a very small back yard, I make an effort to create beauty there every summer, in part because of the passion that my Mom and Dad inspired.  They are so far away that it is impossible to share the changing colour and new blooms, the fruits of my labour.   In fact it was via skype that my father informed me that I need to transplant those little strawberry trailers back into the garden.  I’ll do that today!  I love you, Mom and Dad.  Enjoy the walk with me this morning through my little garden.

Green

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A child said, What is the grass?

A child said, What is the grass? fetching it to me with full
hands;
How could I answer the child?. . . .I do not know what it
is any more than he.

I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful
green stuff woven.

Or I guess it is the handkerchief of the Lord,
A scented gift and remembrancer designedly dropped,
Bearing the owner’s name someway in the corners, that we
may see and remark, and say Whose?

Or I guess the grass is itself a child. . . .the produced babe
of the vegetation.

Or I guess it is a uniform hieroglyphic,
And it means, Sprouting alike in broad zones and narrow
zones,
Growing among black folks as among white,
Kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congressman, Cuff, I give them the
same, I receive them the same.

And now it seems to me the beautiful uncut hair of graves.

Tenderly will I use you curling grass,
It may be you transpire from the breasts of young men,
It may be if I had known them I would have loved them;
It may be you are from old people and from women, and
from offspring taken soon out of their mother’s laps,
And here you are the mother’s laps.

This grass is very dark to be from the white heads of old
mothers,
Darker than the colorless beards of old men,
Dark to come from under the faint red roofs of mouths.

O I perceive after all so many uttering tongues!
And I perceive they do not come from the roofs of mouths
for nothing.

I wish I could translate the hints about the dead young men
and women,
And the hints about old men and mothers, and the offspring
taken soon out of their laps.

What do you think has become of the young and old men?
What do you think has become of the women and
children?

They are alive and well somewhere;
The smallest sprouts show there is really no death,
And if ever there was it led forward life, and does not wait
at the end to arrest it,
And ceased the moment life appeared.

All goes onward and outward. . . .and nothing collapses,
And to die is different from what any one supposed, and
luckier.

Walt Whitman

Lupins in Full Bloom

Detail: Lupin

June 16, 2011 Back Beds

Every springtime I feel as though a little bit of the East Coast of Canada rests with me in my flower beds.  The amazing rich colours that fill even the ditches of Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Ontario are so amazing!

 

Gardens: Lupins

Lupins

On my west-east migrations I have enjoyed the awesome colour of lupin plants, whether it be the blue lupins that make their way between cracks in solid rock in the B.C. mountains or thick fields of pink, white, lavendar and purple lupins in Ontario, all the way east to the Atlantic Provinces.  They are spectacular! I have always planted lupins!

 They seed so well and crop up throughout the garden.  They are hardy in direct sunlight, but are generous hosts to aphids.  The aphids will suck them dry, so you really have to keep an eye on that, particularly here in Calgary.  Once established, these blooms are very easy to grow.  I have really enjoyed a thicker batch of these the past two years!  I am also going to post a photograph here of some of the lupins I found, just outside of Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Thunder Bay Lupins