Being a Champion for Osprey!

Of course!  The Osprey are on my mind these days, so let’s see what Grade Three can pull off!  I shared, with the students, a few of my own photographs of Osprey.  We talked about the similarities and differences between Eagles, Hawks and Osprey because, even adults, get them confused with one another.

Earlier in the day, the students had discussed, with me, the aspects of a champion.  I told them that I am a champion for nature and always will be.  They told me stories about their champions and then went to their seats to write a couple of paragraphs about someone they consider to be a champion in their lives.  During art, we would be champions for nature, by talking for a while about how Enmax has built platforms throughout our city in order to help the Osprey out and to protect them.

Then, the students would use their artistic practice to be champions, by making art that would teach others about the Osprey.

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David Allen Sibley is an American ornithologist. What better person to demonstrate some real basics of the form involved with drawing a profile view of an Osprey?  The students made three sketches in their visual journals.  YES!  Three!  Practice practice practice!  If my readers want to see how challenging it is to draw the beaks, the form of the body and the head shape, try to draw along with David Sibley, here.  While I wanted to do a small composition with the students in chalk pastel, I also wanted to prepare them.  The practice was invaluable and the compositions ended up fantastic!

I recommend that you put this video on silent as the music is very irritating…however, I wanted to give the students practice drawing the Osprey looking the other direction.  Most chose to incorporate this posture for their composition and worked from their own drawings, as references.

Here’s some of what the students accomplished.  Thank you for your class, Jenn.  The students were absorbed and determined as they produced their compositions.  Having the practice under their belts, the chalk drawings took a little over 30 minutes…no pencil was used in the compositions.

Pencil sketching from projected Youtube videos…

Students used white chalk to block in their simple contour lines to define where their Osprey would be placed in the composition.

With a foundation of Reflection and Depiction, the students then had opportunity to Compose and Express, using the media.  They learned to leave bits of the ground (green paper surface) exposed…to turn their chalk pastels onto their sides and on the tip, for different mark making.  A very absorbed activity.

When all was said and done, some of the students shared with me that when they were in Grade Two, I spent a class drawing Eagles with them.  I showed them a Live Eagle Cam from Duke Farms.  No eagles showed up to nest at Duke Farms this year.

I think that it’s a very cool thing that some of these students have studied the Eagle and now, the Osprey.

Show Grade Twos a Nest, And They’ll Draw It!

Arachnophobia: Grade 4 Art Happening

What a wonderful group of grade fours!  They were very intense about their art…from the very beginning until the very end.

I began the class by asking the students what makes people scared of spiders.  We thought about why they have become a symbol and decoration for creepy times like Halloween.  We shared all of the types of spiders we know about from library books, movies, stories and experience.  We talked for a while about Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White.

In their visual journals, the students designated a BEFORE page and an AFTER page.  I asked them to draw a spider, with their own knowledge and understanding and idea of what a spider looks like.  It could be entirely imaginary or be based on something they’ve seen before.  They were asked to add as much detail as possible.

The variety of interpretations was amazing.  I love love love their BEFORE images.

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Next, I showed the students a YouTube video…great guy…easy going and enjoyable script, “How to Draw a Red Back Spider.”  I have never been a big fan of HOW TO DRAW books, but honestly, when a class is swelling to 29 to 32 students…the YouTube Video is a way for the teacher to filter around the classroom, assist and support students.  If you are doing a demonstration/explanation at the front of the room, with your back to the students, really you are less engaged with them and more being a ‘bit of a show off’. I’m laughing as I type this.  Do what you want!  It’s just that, very late in the game, I’ve discovered that these little videos are superb for the Depiction part of a lesson.

This guy is great.

The very same students who had created the BEFORE drawings posted above, drew the following AFTER depictions.

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I didn’t have a lot of time for prep…was busy eating up a bowl of homemade leek and potato soup, so I grabbed black and white paint and orange paper and so began the expressive portion of the lesson.

Using chalk for drawing, the students were asked to use their sketches in order to create a Red Back Spider on a web.  The red spot could be coloured after both the spider and web were painted…using a red Mr. Sketch marker.

The resulting BLOW OUT session was remarkable!  A great time seeing students show their own spin on the subject.  I only wish that I had my Canon with me.  But, this will give my readers some ideas.

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Little Birds

Thank you, Jenn, for your wonderful class!  They were amazing, respectful and so appreciative of everything I had to share with them.  I enjoyed being in your class.  I’ve collected a few ideas here that I thought other teachers might appreciate.

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These art ideas are colourful and include subjects that grade three students adore, ANIMALS!  I turned on Duke’s LIVE Eagle Cam while the students wrote their journal pages this morning and they were amazed.

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I browsed around as they worked and discovered some wonderful guidance in the word walls, the charts and the resources that are posted for student use throughout the classroom.

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This afternoon, I spoke to the students a little bit about how we can sometimes feel abandoned by God, at times when big things happen, like the news of so many people having to leave their homes in Fort McMurray.  This morning in Health, we had learned about several ways to calm ourselves down when life is stressful and we practiced a five minute meditation together.  It was amazing how calming that time was!

So, we wondered this afternoon,’when something big happens, what are some ways that we can calm down the stressful feelings we are having?’  Well, it is really helpful to know that there are kind and caring people around who are going to be there for us.  I spoke to them about the Footprints prayer and that sometimes when we don’t experience God close to us, “it is then that HE carries us”.  We are not alone.  Look at the lilies of the fields.  Look at the sparrows…the tiny birds…if our Father loves them, how much more does He love us?

I moved from this shared conversation into an art activity where I spoke to the students about observing a sparrow family in a vent across from my kitchen table.  I’ve watched these sparrows for the past six years.  At this point, there were all sorts of stories shared about nests/eggs/sparrows and I tried to listen to every one of them.

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The students are really getting to appreciate that a visual journal is for practice and exploration.  I was really impressed by their studies.

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I handed out small-scale pieces of heavy toothed white paper for their final compositions. While students were drawing, they took turns painting swirling sky colour onto blue construction mural paper, in order to create a sense of spring and atmosphere.  The students added colour with pencil crayon, to their final depictions and after observing several projected images of sparrows.

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Collaborative projects are a way of displaying smaller projects that are skill oriented.  Thanks for your class today, Jenn.

Being Caribou in Grade Two

We did the morning rituals…O’ Canada, prayer, calendar math, a reading about Samson and Delilah.

This is a difficult Old Testament reading to translate into grade two terms.  I did the best I could, but it was still tricky getting past the gouged eyes and the fact that the pillars were dropping on top of everyone.  However, we did our very best.

When we entered the room this morning, we saw an elf (and I’m afraid that I’ve missed out on the stories and the thoughtful handling of the elf up until this point…definitely a pop culture sort of experience) hanging from looped chain on the far side of the room. The children, in their excitement, wrote a journal entry responding to its location in the room and what they thought must have happened during the night.

From this point, the day became about caribou…also known loosely as North American reindeer.  You see the connection with the season, don’t you?

I projected this image…

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From somewhere behind me, a young lady’s voice chirped in, “My Dad kills caribou!”

I let it be, as you might also, in the same situation.

Someone answered, “He does?”

I messed around with the zillions of chords that were puzzling me, thinking ahead to the little piece of film from the documentary, Being Caribou, that I hoped to show a little later on.  (I wonder how I will figure out the sound part of this?)

She piped in again, “He kills deer and moose too!”

I had no choice but to respond, “You must get to eat some very tasty sausage, right?”  She just looked at me.

We divided a large chart paper into two sections, one with the heading Deer, the other, Caribou.  Using the image as a reference, we created a list of physical traits that make the deer and the caribou similar and different.  I forgot to take a picture of this for the purpose of illustrating this blog.

Once we had a list of vocabulary accomplished, I gave the students each a piece of regular white paper to do a depiction from the reference.  They could use media of their choice, but I wanted them to include all of the parts that we had listed; hooves, beard and antlers.

Kath's Canon, December 8, 2015 Caribou Art Grade 2 027

Recess, Hymn Sing and Skip Counting by 2s, 5s and 10s and finally I had sorted out  the sound issue and set the movie to playing the most wondrous migration of the Porcupine Herd caribou herds.  The students verbally ooohhhhed and awed…and I remembered my reaction when I first saw this section of the movie some years ago.

I stopped the film when the baby caribou found its legs and then began to create our Caribou Migration.  It took a few minutes to learn that caribou run in herds and not in flocks.

How many caribou would be in our herd if each person in our room made ten caribou? (count by tens)

Kath's Canon, December 8, 2015 Caribou Art Grade 2 026

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A beautiful creation!  Thank you, Tracy, for your beautiful class!

Kath's Canon, December 8, 2015 Caribou Art Grade 2 047

Jenn’s Classroom on November 10, 2015

I had the morning to enjoy the fact that my egress window was under construction.  Once the crew packed up and the shop-vac was loaded into the truck, I headed over for a lovely afternoon in Jenn’s classroom!  Love what this lady does with her class, especially her writing activities!  Halloween, just passed, I have to post these…a fantastic idea for learning the art of writing descriptive paragraphs.  Give the students their own gourd!  Look at these! Amazing!

Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 003 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 002 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 001Once settled in, attendance taken, quiet reading and a recitation of ‘In Flander’s Fields’,  I got the students prepped for their afternoon Remembrance Day Liturgy in the gym.  I have to say that I’m so grateful for the Catholic School District, where we are free to openly pray and share scripture.  The celebration was so wonderfully organized by Grades 2, 4 and 5.  No surprise, but I silently shed some tears in the back of the gym where I sat…it was such a touching service.  I liked the music so much.  The grade fives sang Dropkick Murphy’s The Green Fields of France.

The Grade four choir sang, so beautifully, In Flander’s Fields. Amazing job, Tracy and Melina. I’m posting the same number performed by another children’s choir.

Once the liturgy had ended, there were only 40 minutes left to explore the poppy lesson that I had taught last week in a full afternoon.  The children, though, were so receptive and task oriented, I decided to see what we could accomplish.  Well…to my amazement…we reflected, created depictions, used oil pastel for detail after blocking the poppies in with chalk, and finally, filled in the petals with brilliant red paint.  I really like these and find the finished works remind me a lot of Georgia O’Keefe’s poppies…perhaps providing a window to a written reflection.  Thank you for your class, Jenn.  What an awesome afternoon!

I loved these sensitive little drawings so much that I’m going to post them all!

Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 052 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 049 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 048 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 047 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 046 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 045 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 044 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 043 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 042 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 041 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 040 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 039 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 038 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 037 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 036 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 035 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 034 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 033 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 032 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 031 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 030 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 029 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 028 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 027 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 026 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 025 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 024 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 023 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 022 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 021 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 020 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 019 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 018 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 017 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 016 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 015 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 014 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 013 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 012 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 011 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 010 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 009 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 008 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 007 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 006 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 005 Kath's Canon, November 11, 2015 Grade 3 Poppies, Burnsland, Bush 026

Blue Heron in Autumn Pond

I taught grade four students in the afternoon.  I guided them through some free form water colour pieces, but first, encouraged them to complete four studies of the heron in order to understand proportions.

I shared some of my recent photographs of the heron that’s been hanging out, fishing, at Frank’s Flats.

Kath's Canon, September 22, 2015 early aft Frank's Flats Heron 030The students folded a piece of paper into four to use for their practice drawings.  This gave them the idea of how tall their herons needed to be…head touching the top, feet touching the bottom.  We used a very contrived series of steps, but step by step instructions are sometimes super helpful, especially when learning the basic structures of an animal or bird.  I used this one and projected it on the smart board.

Blue Heron Step by StepTo learn something of the water colour process, I did a demonstration and we used their favourite LARGE heron sketch and applied the water colour to the sketch.  I discovered that the most difficult two things about drawing a heron were, how to make it large enough and how to create that ‘S’ movement in the neck.  The final water colour painting was done on transparent paper that was placed on top of their coloured sketch and rendered with no use of pencil.

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We watched a couple of Youtube videos where WC techniques were explored in a minimalist approach.

And so…from there, this is what we used.  By the way, reuse those Lunchable snack trays for palettes.  I found those tucked in the storage room.  Also the students need pencil for their depictions, a variety of water colour brushes (soft bristle) a small squeeze of payne’s grey, blue, and later, yellow to be mixed with both for the bull rushes, a yogurt container with a small bit of water in it.  That should do.  Remember that if you don’t have a sink in your classroom, ask the caretaker to give you a wash bucket half filled with water.  Works great.

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Finding That View at create!

There are many approaches taken by artists to achieve perspective and build an accurately proportioned and modeled figure/subject on a flat surface.  They sometimes use a viewfinder when it is difficult to determine the overall composition of their piece.

Some of my readers may not know what I mean when I talk about overall composition…here are a couple of ‘rules’ that any artist can basically ‘throw out’ of their artistic tool kit if they wish…but, I tend to observe these.

In the past, I have used a slide frame as a viewfinder and shared that tool with my students.  What a basic viewfinder will do is eliminate a lot of the chaos that appears around the subject of the piece the artist is composing and crop the piece so that the composition is dynamic and gains interest.

Slide Frame ViewfinderAnother technique that helps to accurately transfer information and placement of content in a composition is to grid both a flat reference or photograph and the larger surface of the canvas/panel or paper with squares of equal proportion.  (The number of grid squares measured on the reference must be the same as the number of grid squares measured on the drawing surface and the ratio of those must be consistent in their ratio, 1:4 for example.) What the viewer/artist sees in the top right hand square is then transferred onto the drawing/painting surface accurately.  Here are a couple of examples of paintings and drawings rendered by my former middle school students, using this technique.  I think that this provides an exercise for student artists in observation and in training those brain/eye/arm/finger muscles to work together.

March 17 2009 Art and Feb Words 130 March 17 2009 Art and Feb Words 035 IMG_8185View finding and using a grid system are only two techniques used to compose.  On this subject, there is a huge and sometimes complex manner of creating a well-proportioned image.  Any and all techniques are available to every artist to the extent that they wish to use them.  It is often a magical thing to make reference to some basic skills in drawing and painting before one tears into self-expression.  If it is not your intention to distort figures in your work, it can be a frustrating thing to do beautiful painting and mark making that is lost because the eye travels immediately to the loss of foreshortening or proportion.

I have randomly selected a couple of videos here that demonstrate formal techniques.

Then…there is also the Fibonacci principle.  Wowsah!

Presently, in Calgary, my friend, Douglas Williamson, is the featured artist at Collector’s Art Gallery.  He has a practice that includes some of the very technical aspects of rendering and painting.  I admire his work and his dedication.

Most of the time, quite frankly, especially during events like Rumble House painting, I ‘eyeball’ it and remember that my teachers always told me that I had a bit of a natural sense for composition.  I just naturally eliminate peripheral visual information that I don’t want included when I am plein air painting or working in my studio.  Artistic style and intention need to be kept in mind and not forgotten.  I think it’s a dangerous thing when one artist tells another how things SHOULD be done.  Some artists work in a purely intuitive manner.

As I’ve discussed before, many contemporary artists access slide projection or image projection in order to create a large and accurate view.  Some among us label such artists ‘cheaters’ and this makes me laugh because typically the connoisseur of art knows little about the process.  Ted Godwin demonstrated his technique for me in his studio, as did Bill Webb. With every brush stroke, the works created by both artists became unique and while accurate in terms of the perspective, breathed the life and human touch not found in a photograph.

P1070233Recently, I saw that a facilitator, Francois Lavigne, at the wonderful create! in East Village had constructed a viewfinder that I thought would be fun to use while doing a seated sketch.

Viewfinder by Francois So, I headed down to see Wendy Lees and the gang at create!, now housed in the Center of Hope next door to the Salvation Army. Present yesterday, were people I care about so much, but haven’t seen for the longest time.  It was nice to meet Margot and Philip Lozano of Momentum, as well!  I hoped to hook up with Francois and purchase a viewfinder…and I did!  WHOOT!

One of the projects during the open session was a section for a Calgary Public Library project in the works at create!  So, I sat down and painted me a panel and ate up the varied and enthusiastic conversations that ensued.  Thanks, Wendy!  Thanks, Francois.  If you are an artist who is interested in the purchase of a viewfinder, please contact Francois directly here.

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Grade Threes see the Taj Mahal Through Their Own Window

I saw the beautifully illustrated books lining the window sill of the grade three class room and knew that we needed to paint something in the jeweled colours of India.  HOW WONDERFUL!  One illustration, in particular, struck me and so, with this as my inspiration, we began our journey from the soft sculpted forms of the outdoor Taj Mahal, to the highly decorated interior.

DSC_1826This activity was designed for two distinct art experiences.  I didn’t wish the paint to cross over into the delicate pencil crayon drawings.  We spoke about different shapes that make up architecture and I projected an image of the Taj Mahal on the Smart board.  I turned on the Bollywood music and the drawings began.  Of course, the question soon surfaced about how you make things look “NOT FLAT”.  Turning off the music, I gave a basic lesson in how to show light and shadow, to be followed, once colouring, with how colouring practices the same muscles as hand writing does.

“My muscles for handwriting don’t work very well.”

“Well, colouring your Taj Mahal will be like hand writing practice then.”

Reflection and Depiction are so often abandoned for the sake of plowing on through that ‘make an art project’ mindset.

DSC_1817DSC_1821 DSC_1820 DSC_1819The boys started dancing, so the Bollywood music was turned off.

I demonstrated adequate pressure (back and forth, back and forth in small amounts, rather than long airy strokes…not hard…but not soft, either) for the students as they began to colour with their pencil crayons.  And this is when we explored weather, atmosphere…beautiful light.  The students, at this point, told me all about monsoon season.  I always act like I know absolutely nothing about these topics and I become learner and they are the teachers.

“How do I do a white Taj Mahal if I don’t have a white pencil crayon?”

This is where we looked at twenty or so photographs on line…different times of day and different weather changed the colour of the Taj Mahal…so basically, any colour families would do once you, the artist, decided what kind of day it was. I showed the students how they could use yellow to show the light on a purple dome…or how they could use green on a blue dome.  The colouring began!

DSC_1840 DSC_1839 DSC_1838 DSC_1837 DSC_1834 DSC_1832 DSC_1831Once completed, these were cut out and traced, with chalk onto their large composition, then set aside.  Chalk is used to break the entire composition into borders, a window sill and a flower box.

PAINTING!

The palette I set up was a mixture of ‘spice’ colours…cumin, cinnamon.  We talked about the spices that get mixed up…we talked about curry and yellow food.  I gave half of the class purple paper and half brown.  The students with purple paper worked with the six buckets of warm colours first for background.  The students with brown paper traveled back and forth from the cool palette for their background.  After lunch and drying time, they would switch palettes for their interior patterns.  There were 22 students in this class, so 11 pods of 2 students. I explain how to do all of this in previous painting lessons.

Backgrounds before lunch…patterns after lunch.  We were sooo busy that I didn’t grab photos for these two steps, but only photographed the end results, after gluing the Taj Mahals into the windows.  Let your paintings dry before the gluing!  We did Math families and agendas before that step!

DSC_1896 ??????????The artist who created the following painting was so intent on her Taj Mahal colouring that she is not quite finished, but she can do that on her large piece…amazing work!   ?????????? ?????????? ?????????? DSC_1889 DSC_1888 ?????????? DSC_1885 ?????????? DSC_1883 ?????????? DSC_1881 ?????????? DSC_1879 ?????????? DSC_1876 ?????????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????????? ??????????These are beautiful, unpredictable and richly coloured.  I totally enjoyed the openness of the students, their excitement, commitment and knowledge.  We can’t all travel to far off place, but we can explore them through books, learning, art and we can open our souls to their colours, textures, sights, smells and sounds.  I am grateful for their teacher.

 

 

 

Grade Ones Never Fail to Impress

These little gaffers made a real impression!  The white stuff was falling outdoors, but nothing could keep us from thinking about colour, light and flowers in grade one last week.  I spoke to the children for a bit about sitting in Monet’s gardens, perched on one bridge and looking across the water to another.  We talked about flowers.  Aren’t Smart boards wonderful?  Isn’t it a tremendous thing to be able to pull up images of waterlilies to look at on a wintry spring day?  Or to visit Paris in a moment? Or to be able to walk the halls of the Louvre?  Technology is wonderful.

I also enjoy the fact that children as young as this will take on depiction…looking at references and transferring what they see onto a surface.  It’s a brilliant thing watching the mind, eye, arm, hand co-ordinate to do such an amazing thing!

In the end, they decided that the Impressionists liked making ‘smudges’.  So, they proceeded to ‘smudge’, like little worker-ants.  It was a morning of beauty and light.

Thank you to Jon, who cleaned up all the white paint trays.  I am so grateful!

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Grade 1 2014 Monet 8 Grade 1 2014 Monet 7 Grade 1 2014 Monet 6 Grade 1 2014 Monet 5

Grade Fours Make a Hoot!

Textures were achieved by the use of line and pattern…one built upon another to create owls of all sorts.  Aspects of this activity were challenging.  Already, at grade four, you can see where the freedom of childhood drawing is winding up.  The questions are beginning to surface.  Can I do this? Is this good? Does this look like_____?  In the end, the owls have wonderful facial expressions and magical whimsy.

Sometimes Picasso said it best…

“Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.”
Pablo Picasso

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Grade 4 2014 Owls 18 Grade 4 2014 Owls 17