Mom and Dad…Still Giving

I received a parcel four years ago from Mom and Dad.  It may have been the last year that Mom participated in shopping for Christmas for me before the Alzheimer’s disease stole so much from her.  I put it on a shelf…in a box…thinking that I wouldn’t ever replace a perfectly good and functioning coffee machine.  I owned my white ‘number’ since my #2 was born in 1986.  The past three weeks, I’ve been sticking doubled paper towel underneath my coffee maker so that the water that was leaking would stop spilling over my counter.

Today held the morning of magic; I went down to my basement storage area and brought out my NEW coffee maker.  In the storage room, I was squealing.   And then I went upstairs, read all of the safety concerns, set the bright blue digital numbers to the proper time and then made my first cups of coffee.  What a blessing!  The ‘whitish’ coffee maker is done…it served its years well and I pride myself that I didn’t toss it before its time had passed.

Rarely will I share BEFORE and AFTER shots…but here, it just seems a part of the celebration!

Thanks to the generous hearts of Mom and Dad!

BEFORE

BEFORE

AFTER

AFTER

 

When people go,
when people leave,
make some people cry,
make some people drink.

When people go,
when people leave,
it’s the saddest thing.

When people go,
is it like they’re asleep?
lost to the world,
in the longest dream.

Like when boats at sea,
never come back,
is it like that?

I think it’s going to be,
another long night,
i think it’s going to be,
another long ride.

When people go,
when people leave,
make some people cry,
make some people drink.

When people go,
when people leave,
it’s the saddest thing.

Dizzy in the head,
broke in the heart,
there’s no business,
it’s all art.

Until it’s far behind,
and it all comes back,
when people go it’s so sad, so sad, so sad,
so sad, so sad, so sad.

And goodnight,
and go home,
and there is nothing more to see,
just a song,
in a box,
some need to cry,
and please,
find a friend,
have a drink,
and go home,
taking two,
empty hearts,
go to bed and,
go to bed and.

Well goodnight,
go home,
there is nothing more to see,
my friend,
have a drink,
go to bed,
and tell them,
that you need them,
hold them hold them tight,

Goodnight,
go home,
there is nothing more to see.

Goodnight,
go home,
there is nothing more to see.

Goodnight,
go home,
there is nothing more to see.

I think it’s going to be a long long night.

Goodnight,
go home,
there is nothing more.

Goodnight,
go home,
there is nothing more to see.

Go home.

Changing the Landscape: One Bag At a Time

March 24, 2012 1:30 p.m. 4 degrees intermittent cloud

I didn’t even want to go out today to pick up other people’s garbage.  What do people care anyway?  Out of some sort of self-discipline, I went ahead.  I didn’t feel enthusiasm, but did it out of care for the birds who will be soon nesting in the area and other wildlife.  Driving through the construction zone for the new Deerfooot expansion, I kept in mind how wildlife is already being crowded out by our consumerism and our development.  This is the least I can do.

March 24, 2012 Any given day, I pick up at least 20 Tim Hortons cups, with plastic lids.

After picking, I took my stacks of over 23 Tim Hortons cups to the store, neighbouring the park.  I left my stack in the van, but went in to explore this franchise’s alignment with their own sustainability report.  I found one small sign that encourages people to bring in their travel mugs and save ten cents on their cup of coffee.  I was lucky to find both the manager and the owner, willing to speak with me.  It was a sensible conversation.  The owner listened to what I had to say about the sustainability report and the goal to reduce packaging by 5% every year for the past three years.  He heard what I had to say about implementing a deposit program for returned cups. (I could get rich on a program like this.)  He heard what I had to say about the need for a recycling program that guarantees the scrubbing out of the poly lining and that these cups should NOT be landing in our landfills.  He told me that there would be some follow-up in terms of his input at a future meeting with his fellow business people.  I’m going to hold him to this.

Lattes! The Highschool Market!

Off of the Tim Hortons website….

At Tim Hortons, we are aware of the environmental impacts of our packaging and waste materials. We are attempting to deal with the litter issue in a variety of ways:

  • We have anti-litter messages on all of our packaging items, including a “Do Not Litter” message on all of our take-out cups. Sadly, many people do not pay attention to these messages but we continue to work with other members of our industry to tackle the litter problem in a meaningful and effective way.
  • To ensure a clean community many Tim Hortons restaurants sponsor local clean up events and activities in their communities.
  • We have waste reduction strategies to try and combat litter from its source. Tim Hortons is one of the few quick service restaurants to offer china mugs, plates and bowls to guests eating in our restaurants. This helps to reduce paper waste being created in the first place.
  • All Tim Hortons restaurants sell reusable Tim Mugs. And while a Tim Mug may not be a practical solution for all guests it does provide a good alternative. The incentive for purchasing a Tim Mug is that the first coffee is free (coupon included inside the Tim Travel Mug) and each refill gets a 10 cent discount (hot beverage discount applies to any travel mug fill).

I’m also really wondering about the burned pages of this particular book…every day for more than a month I have trashed these. 

As I pick up other people’s garbage (for example, I found Coach Harvie’s notebook, ripped and soaked on the edge of the park today…) I think about the garbage collectors written into several of my favourite novels.  I’m going to write a separate post about that some time in the future.

Where are you, Marie Delorme? Thinking about a photograph!

Container Ports #10, Delta Port, Vancouver, British Columbia Photographer: Edward Burtynsky

As I continue to look back upon the Glenbow exhibit, Encounters,  I am very much intrigued by the people who were guest curators and their approach to selecting a single photograph by Edward Burtynsky for the exhibit.  Marie Delorme is the CEO for the Imagination Group and is a mentor to many, it seems, in every aspect of her life.  I was moved by the narrative that was exhibited alongside her selection of Container Ports #110, Delta Port, Vancouver, British Columbia.  The gist of Marie’s narrative is that manufacturing and consumerism pulls humankind away from our connection with nature.  I can’t agree more.  I agree that there has to be some reconciliation happen between humanity’s need to consume…and its ability to protect the planet, all at the same time.  This can no longer be a matter of (P)olitics and/or polarized views…somehow we have to come more to a middle in our understanding of the issues.  Thank you for your selection, Marie Delorme and best wishes on your journey!

As you view the Burtynsky photograph,  there is a pathway.  Where does it lead?