Live Stream in Covid Times

Live Streaming is not a new format, but definitely a more frequented format since Covid-19 times! The Internet is spilling over with opportunities to make some human connection through this platform.

In mid March, I found myself without a church community and so my first step into the world of Live Streaming was to connect with, when I could, daily Mass with St. Peter’s parish and weekend Mass with our Bishop McGrattan at the St. Mary’s Cathedral.

I light a wee candle as Mass begins and join in any sung bits and even click little heart icons when I am wanting to participate in public prayer responses.  It is a very strange experience, not to be surrounded by my prayer community, but through Live Streaming, I can remain connected, celebrate the liturgy of the word, take in many inspiring homilies and journey, with support, through these troubling and isolating times.

If a person wants to connect with Live Streaming opportunities, they can be found on most social media platforms.  They could keep you busy all day long, so I have a few favourite ones that I will share here.

Because I come from a creative background, I can not help but feel concerned for the many musicians who rely on income from gigs and live events throughout our city and across the nation.  I often wonder how our local musicians are managing through Covid.  I think it’s a great idea to attend and support at least one musician, artist or other performer through Covid times, if it is possible, without creating a struggle in your own home.

Each evening, at 7:00 Monday through Thursday, I attend I Love Ruthie, a music/book/story telling type event, hosted by Ruth Purves Smith.  This event puts a smile on my face and is conveniently set between dinner and my Skype visit with my father out in Ottawa.  Each evening we meet cats, see plants, hear readings from a book of the day, look out Ruthie’s window to a completely different landscape and answer the question of the day.  An art book of the week is opened to an image each evening…something to think about and ponder.  If you would like to attend, I can connect you with a link.

Ruthie has been self-isolated in a small Alberta hamlet named Stalwell since this all began.

As well, Craig Cardiff is hosting a Live Stream event on all formats: Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.  He is such a generous person and I encourage you to offer support by connecting with his profile on Spotify.

Craig is living with his family in Ontario.  I attend bits and pieces of Craig’s every night performances.

As well as musicians on Live Stream, a person can find a lot of different Live Stream art events and lessons.  While not technically Live Steam, the Esker Foundation provides beautiful and well presented activities for youth and for wee ones, at home. (Keep an eye out because I will feature a ‘How to In Covid Times’ post. They have a fantastic Watch and Listen section on their website.  Take a look! 

I’m filing these away for ‘after the pandemic’ times because I just don’t seem to have time to take absolutely everything on.  I’ve recently done some curbside purchases at the Inglewood Art Store and I’m motivated to get my own creations rolling out of my home studio.

The Glenbow Museum and Gallery have been doing Live Streaming, as have most other gallery spaces.  The first one that I bumped into was ‘Staring at My Four Walls’ With Viviane Art Gallery.  I loved this series.  From here, I went looking and found artist talks, gallery tours and all sorts of efforts being made by supporters of the visual arts.

Christine Klassen’s Art Gallery hosted an art panel during the exhibit Papyromania featuring work by Heather Close and Rick Ducommun and I thought that was very well done.

Don’t feel intimidated by these sorts of experiences.  I know that some have enjoyed Opera, Concert performances and even cooking experiences through Live Streaming.

If you are a nature buff, there are also a whole number of Live Cams set up at nests or rivers, where you can watch Live Streaming.  One of my favourites is the Decorah Live Eagle Cam.  I hope you will explore some of these events and experiences through Covid times.

 

 

Surprise #4: Corb Lund’s Beard

I guess most folks were surprised by Corb Lund‘s beard.  This makes me smile.  There were a lot of fans in the stands for this guy!  He’s got a big heart for Alberta and wrote this tune for the sake of those struggling with the floods.

His website was a great promotion of the event and also captures the culture of our province, along with great music.

@abfloodaid August 15 at McMahon Stadium. All funds raised will benefit all Alberta flood victims. To make a donation: http://abfloodaid.ca/support

Alberta Flood Aid will take place on Thursday, August 15 at 6:00 p.m. at McMahon Stadium.

The concert will feature the following artists: Jann Arden, Randy Bachman, Tom Cochrane, Matthew Good, Nickelback, Colin James, Loverboy, Corb Lund, Johnny Reid, The Sadies, The Sheepdogs, and Ian Tyson. Hosted by comedian Brent Butt.

The performance order is not released yet and more artists may be added. Artist line-up is subject to change, please check back at abfloodaid.ca for updates.

Approximately 30,000 tickets will be sold for this star-studded event and revenue will be donated and Ticketmaster is waiving all service charges normally associated with ticket sales.


Corb Lund spares us any pretentiousness through his genuine nature.  This is easily evidenced by his ‘B[road]casts’ video diary.

A great Albertan, it was wonderful to have Corb Lund offer up his time in support of the folk who will be rebuilding for a very long time.  Charley Engel writes a nice little biography here.  Photo credit: Alexandra Valenti.

Alexandra Valenti: Photo Credit

Alexandra Valenti: Photo Credit


A Day of Contrasts

Pond Off of 22X

 Max and I circled this pond a couple of times yesterday.  It was a warm and glorious day outdoors, absolutely delicious; quite a contrast to the crazy energy at the Pearl Jam concert that evening!  Looking over the vast crowd, completely captivated by the band, I got that sense again, of being so tied into a huge collective voice and presence.  I feel so close to God in either situation; enjoying the calmness of the water OR sharing in the rise and fall of an extraordinary and BIG human voice!

20 Years

Solitude

I’m inspired by the ideas and photographs published here.  And…as I consider solitude, a whole number of thoughts come to mind.  For example,  I disappear into art.  I might be with others, but in an art gallery, I enter into relationship with paintings,  drawings and photographs, sculpture and pieces of art-glass.  Companions, other visitors and dealers circulate within the same spaces, but I am virtually alone.

Kootenay Lake: Remembering Pauline

I love to relax with an awesome piece of literature, but just as much, I enjoy the conversation that happens when I meet someone who has read the same book.  Time with a book is ‘magical’ solitude.  It most often happens by soft light, curled in bed late at night.  It is comfortable.  It is quiet.  It engages my spirit, my feelings and my mind.

I enjoy reading on public transit.  It seems that most everyone else is plugged into electronics, finding their own place of solitude.  I like that I can sometimes near my stop, without realizing it because a book has carried me to a different place.

Solitude is enjoyed while  sitting in the dark, watching a piece of beautiful dance or theater.  With dance, I process my own ‘stories’ and sometimes just enjoy the abstract sense of movement, light and music.  I like the sense of bodies in close proximity…other people engaged in the very same moment, but NOT really engaged with my very same moment.  I enjoy the intimacy of watching beautiful, strong and flexible bodies moving through space for my sake and my pleasure.  The dance speaks to me and again, I experience no judgment, pressure or sense of responsibility to the movement.  It is almost as though it serves me, although I know that unless the viewer brings something to the piece, it is unfinished.

I enjoy watching live theater, especially work that makes me laugh.  I hear myself laughing out loud.  I mean, I REALLY hear myself laugh and then…the play disappears for a moment and I cry in the dark…cry for happiness of hearing myself laugh.  I know that I have many unanswered questions.  I know that I am often-times troubled by various changes that keep happening in my life…but, I cry for happiness and love that comedy causes me to laugh.  There is a huge solitude that I experience in that whole process, alone in the dark.

Writing is a place of solitude and there is very little that feels as satisfying to me.  I feel so calm, watching words fly across a ‘page’.  I try to write something every day.  It is as though writing can take me to a place of solitude that is very honest and so ideas are generated, problems are resolved and feelings are expressed. 

Hiking, even with friends, is a place of solitude.  I like the sound of each step…because on the trails, as I exert myself, each step becomes something that I consider.  Muscles come alive.  I feel sun or rain on my face.  Unlike the hectic life engaged with work and social activities, hiking brings me home to myself.  I see things because I slow enough to notice.  I hear my footsteps.

In Fatal Wanderings: Thoughts on Jon Krakauer’s “Into the Wild”, solitude becomes a tragic circumstance.  And, very honestly, sometimes I feel that I am pulled into a sad place in a circumstance of too much solitude…but, what I’ve tried to write about tonight is the absolute wonder and magic of solitude in just some of its forms.  Solitude can be a very beautiful thing.

Marking Night

It’s 9:41 as I begin typing….and look!   I’ve been sitting by a desk lamp marking for most of the evening.  But only moments ago, received a beautiful call from my son.
 
Too, too lengthy a story for a blog, but I will say only this.  Through some very interesting circumstances, both of my children are sitting in the seventh row of the Pengrowth Saddledome at the time of this typing.  Truth is, I know they wish I was there with them.  They are listening to Mick and the boys….this, after the wonderful start-up band that I’ve been following for years, 54-40. 
 
I received a call from the two of them at the intermission.  They asked what song I wanted to hear and asked only that I leave the answering machine to receive the call.  I requested Honky Tonk Women.  As I finished up another Grade Nine english paper, the phone rang.  There, for me, captured on tape was the beautiful lyric, Wild Horses.  How profound that my children should choose this one!  As I drove them to the train tonight I had opened up with them about how I still treasure rituals like carving pumpkins….and I really feel as though they are slipping away…and that I understand that they have to grow up….but it’s hard.  It’s so hard.
 
And now…the haunting melody….the words…
 
 
Wild Horses couldn’t drag me away…and tacked onto the end, the sweet sound of my son’s voice…. “We LOVE YOU MOM!”
  
I am so well-loved and so grateful.