More of Mark!

I guess I’ve published a few posts, now, about  Mark Vazquez-Mackay.

Here

and

Here

and

Here

Gee, I must be a fan!  And…I am!

Last Friday night, Mark exhibited his travel sketches at the Rumble House.  I hope that my Calgary readers took the opportunity to enjoy this show and the narratives and the hospitality.  It was a wonderful thing!  While I won’t write a lot here, I will post my documentation of the exhibit.

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The next three photographs are posted, with permission by the photographer, Rich Theroux, on the trade that I will show up for figure drawing on Thursday night. :0)

Mark V's show 4Mark V's show3Mark V's show

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Are You My Father?

Yesterday afternoon I enjoyed a turkey, cranberry and stuffing sandwich at Central Blends  and viewed a beautiful exhibit of paintings done by artist, Debbie Desmarais.  These were very powerful paintings, with a very loaded subject matter.  I hope that those of you living in Calgary will have a chance to view them as they will move you to the core.  Then, go home and pull out your history books.  It’s quite some story!  It was good to have time with you, Desere and Debbie.

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Debbie Desmarais, giving me her calm, cool and collected look.

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From Blackwell Reference:

“The significance of the Battle of Little Bighorn lies more in the stand made by two fearless American Indian leaders than in the defeat of General George Armstrong Custer. Both Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull found their peak as revolutionaries on the Little Bighorn River in Montana in the summer of 1876, in a battle that would both add to their legends and seal their fate. The contribution made by Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull to the defense of the American Indian lies not just in this epic battle, but in a fearless commitment to lead their people against an oppressive United States government. Tashunke Witko (1849–77) or Crazy Horse emerged as a military leader of the Ogeala Sioux tribe while still a young man in his mid-twenties. He was courageous and daring, having mastered the techniques of Indian warfare. Crazy Horse was relentless in his hatred for the white man, clearly opposed to abandoning hunting lands sacred to his people in exchange for a quiet reservation existence. Tatanka Iyotake (1831–90), known all over the world as Sitting Bull, would become the most revered chief of the Teton or Western Sioux, often referred to as the Sioux of Sioux. As the leader of history’s largest assembly of Plains Warriors, Sitting Bull was a visionary band chief and practicing shaman whose strength lay in a natural ability to plan and organize. He lived his life, in service to his people.”

Wonders 93 Little Big Horn

My son…at Little Big Horn.