Eric Wicherts Visits KOAC

I was introduced to my new friend, Eric Wicherts, in the midst of a pandemic.  I won’t forget that.  It is a beautiful thing that something wondrous took place when times were unexpectedly difficult.  Eric has lived and continues to live a very interesting life and conversations are always interesting, but not so much when both of us are wearing masks and unable to sort out the mumbles.  Writing one another seems to be our most optimal form of communication and I look forward to hearing from him as he writes his advise, experience and his efforts on recent projects.

The day I met Eric, he spoke the entire time about his beloved wife, Andie, who passed away in May of 2019.  Eric created a beautiful archive and history of Andie and her artistic journey in a book, aptly titled, Andie.  This is such a thorough compilation of a life’s work.  It is an incredible book.

As I experienced the beauty of Andie’s studio that day, I thought to myself, ‘this couple had an incredibly interesting life together’.

It is only through letters, since, and our few conversations that I am getting to know more about Eric Wicherts, without Andie.  He is a remarkable story teller.  I hope my readers will follow the link above in order to hear an interview.  As time passed, it became obvious that I should invite Eric to see the amazing KOAC project and reconnect with Harry Kiyooka and Katie Ohe.

Yesterday was the day!

With Eric tucking into my back seat and dawning a mask, off we headed for the country, but by a very convoluted route.  I took my cues from google maps, a system that was in no way as expedient as taking Eric’s verbal directions.  The return to his residence at the end of the afternoon, was seamless and direct.

I would like to express a great deal of gratitude to both Harry and Katie for their generous welcome and their delicious conversation.  It was a busy day, as a free tour was being offered at 2 pm, an exciting offering during Alberta Culture Days.

At a point, I left Harry and Eric to visit and engaged in a segment of the tour where a person can experience the convergence of art, nature, sculpture and story.

Tours are available every Saturday at 2 through September. Contact heidi@koartscentre.org.

It was early in the conversation that I shared with Katie how she, along with other strong female artists and my sister, had inspired me to return to complete my BFA.

Eric has attended one of the KOAC fundraisers at the Hotel Arts.  Here, Katie is showing him some of the news coverage on one of those events.

Violets.

Sphere by Christian Eckhart can be seen at the right.

An early Alexander Caldwell to the left…I’m forgetting the title.

Katie’s Mother and Turtle in the foreground and 2 Crack, Pot Column Sculpture behind.

A close up of Sphere by Christian Eckhart.

The tour is listening to a description of the cement fondue piece, Woman Standing by Norman Sjoman.  Bob Morrell is in the foreground.

Garden Sculpture by John Andrekson

A wee piece of ceramic pottery by Roy Kiyooka is sitting in the gardens…

An incredible story shared about Snakes by Elli Scheepens.

Zigzag by Claudia Questo

Earth Mother by Mich DeMuth

Two works by KO Arts Centre Resident Artist James Ziegler

Dandelion by Katherin Dobbins

Time spent, deep in conversation and deep in thought, with Eric and Harry.  Harry shares such a rich collection of stories and remembrances.  This part of the visit smacked of nostalgia and gratitude.

“What is a teacher? I’ll tell you: it isn’t someone who teaches something, but someone who inspires the student to give of her best in order to discover what she already knows.”
― Paulo Coelho, The Witch of Portobello
Thank you, Eric, for the beautiful afternoon.  I like what you said as I left you at your door.  “I hope that I will see you again.”  I will, Eric.

 

Alberta Culture Days in Claresholm!

Donning my orange shirt, I got Max out for a quick walk on city sidewalks, dropped him home to a delicious breakfast (yeah, right?) and hopped in the car for a road trip to Claresholm, Alberta.  My friend-descendants of British Home Children were gathering for a display opportunity in the Claresholm Exhibition Hall and I really wanted to join them.  Yesterday was the first National British Home Child Day and I felt very pleased for the recognition and the remembrances that were shared yesterday by descendants who had grown up with mystery, secrets and shame around their ancestry.  I think that the disconnect from any roots at all is likely the most upsetting aspect of growing up in home child culture…very few children ever found solace in a relationship with siblings or Mom or Dad.  There was a helplessness there, a disconnect and a sense of true abandonment, often in powerlessness against abuse of all sorts.

In Canada, so many years later, families are hard at work, trying to unearth unspoken histories and share narratives that have been revealed via contact with the people who continue to house the files and reports on our ancestral family.  At a price and with great patience, piece by piece, we are all discovering who our people were, though most will discover that, at a point, the information will drop off.  Never did our ancestors show up on a Canadian census unless they were working as domestics in very wealthy homes.  I know that I have not found my great grandfather on any binding document between ages 13 and 21.  Those eight years are gone, although the families under which he was employed are well-documented in the foot prints of time.

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On a lighter note, I was so pleased to find Bruce and Connie, Hazel and John gathered before a beautiful display.  Hazel worked very hard to establish our representation at the open house and I have much gratitude for her efforts and her lovely display.  I appreciate that Bruce collected both Connie and John for the afternoon drive on such a cold and blustery day.  And I thank Bruce for the lovely addition to our Western Canadian collection, the poster featuring our new logo.  Excellent.

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Although I have other photographs of my four friends, I enjoy the fact that John Vallance’s true personality is showing through here and that Connie is taking it all in.  If any of you would like a more formal photograph for your files, just contact me.

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The woman who did the physical work here…and a visionary for BHC in the west, our Hazel Perrier.

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The program that the Claresholm museum hosted was fabulous!  I want to thank the town and its people who extended their hospitality.  I know that it was a cold and grey day, but the events and the people created a warm and happy experience for all in attendance.  I really enjoyed the sincere presentation/words and hoop dance performed by Sandra Lamouche. Due to lighting, very few of my photographs give justice to her performance and I hope that my readers will take a look at her website.

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At a point, Bruce, Connie and I went for a cup of tea in a neighbouring restaurant and we enjoyed a very yummy lunch.  It was nice to catch up with Bruce and Connie.  They are great people and I am so happy that they are in my life, with a common interest of family research and history.  I also had the opportunity to wander both the exhibition hall and the museum.  There is nothing like a focused wander through a museum, especially one with an RCAF display!  I enjoyed conversations with two ‘hookers’ who produce amazing works in the tradition of East Coast hooking and a lady who descends from family in Norway.  Very interesting stories and generous contributions!

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When I pulled out of my parking spot to head home at 4:30, I could still hear the ringing of beautiful music coming out of the concert tent.  Today was a perfect day and I’m grateful for the opportunity to enjoy another Alberta Culture Day.

Remember…please…Leave NO CHILD BEHIND!

Hazel, John, Kath, Bruce, Connie