Black-crowned Night Heron: 2018

I just wanted to make a quick post.  I’m elated that a pair of Black-crowned Night Herons has returned to Frank’s Flats (not to be mistaken for Frank Lake), this season.  I’ve watched the adults and juveniles at this pond location for about five years, a couple of years after I began my daily circling of these wetlands.  I purchased my Canon Powershot camera the third season I watched them.  I’ve captured the odd successful photograph since, but mostly out of focus bits from places well outside my zone. This photo from 2017 captured the gesture of the birds amazing feet/legs.

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They have this way of looking other-worldly…the red eyes…fantastic!

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It has also been explained to me that these beautiful and amusing males have long plumes at the crown that dominate during mating season.  I particularly enjoy this article that describes them as ‘masters of motionlessness’!  Somewhere in my archives I have my very first siting of a Night Heron at this location.  I will add it later.  I can remember how excited I was.

I particularly enjoyed watching the seeming-connection between the two juveniles of last season…they were wonderful to watch…early articulations, flying together, hiding together and practicing their fishing together.

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There has been such destructive development that has come with the South West Ring Road (Stoney Trail) that oft-times people like me who are crazy about birds feel their blood boil.  It has been difficult to watch the huge impact of human encroachment.  Such a dramatic loss of natural plants/shrubs and trees!  Loss of water sources…loss of shoreline and the addition of many fence systems, barriers and pavement.  It’s a wonder this sort of magic can surface in the fray.

Yesterday, I watched an adult Black-crowned Night Heron feeding on minnows/small fish for quite some time.  Statuesque stillness and then a flash of motion, followed by a big gulp and then repeat.  I think I laughed out loud.  These images, again, taken from a huge distance, but they capture the gesture of the experience.

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