Meeting John McKee

Time spent in Comox was about a lot of things, not the least of which was coming to the realization that when your life collides with another life, it’s a tremendous thing to really open up to that experience.  REALLY getting to know a person, teaches you just how amazing human beings are.  I marvel at the unique gift of each person.  I know that sounds cliche, but it is true.

Grace took Cayley and me up to meet John McKee late one night so that we might look through one of his telescopes at the moon.  I was so much in awe of the crisp image and detail on the surface of the moon that I cried…but there was so much more to this story.  We rotated through one turn after another, gazing through this powerful backyard telescope.  The rest of the time, we leaned back in lawn chairs and watched the shooting stars dart across the sky.  In fact, this was the night of my first bat-in-flight experience as well.

I have no doubt that I will be writing about John again, but consider this an introduction. John, a former air force man, is an astronomer who intensely studies the universe and so can speak eloquently about all matters of the sky…and when you’re finished that, you can get into his reading list and beyond.  In his day, he consistently attended the seven-day party at 1,800 meters above sea level in the mountains near Osoyoos to star gaze with other enthusiasts and to consider his life an adventure is an understatement!

His home was stacked from top to bottom with objects of his affection, items that he’s collected and constructed, both.  As well as turning wood and doing fine leather work, designing and building boats, constructing his own home, he, in 17 years,  built 32 telescopes for people across Canada.  I was very fortunate in that I had opportunity to use and adjust one of these.

The telescopes that John McKee builds are reflecting telescopes.  In future posts, I will write about the methods of his construction as well as the effectiveness of this type of scope.  He DID reference an Italian monk, Niccolo Zucchi of 1616, who made the first reflector, but never mastered the right shape for the mirror and could never figure out how to look at the image properly.  As my readers know, it took Isaac newton to take the reflector idea and perfect the telescope in 1670.

I asked John if a book had been written about his life and work and he quickly responded in the negative. (Before I left, John passed me a duplicate copy of an article that was written by Ryan Stuart about his star-gazing and was published in the Comox Valley InFocus Magazine August/September 2006). I have written to Ryan Stuart to talk to him more about his interview with John.  This meeting caused me to ponder how many brilliant people I have yet to meet…people who are enthusiastically exploring their passion regardless of any sort of notoriety. It also caused me to fill up with gratitude for the brilliant people who are already in my life and who fill me to the brim on a regular basis. In a future post, I will share some of the books on John’s list.  The Lost Continent of Mu by James Churchward would be a start. You just might want to join me in learning history that might have slipped past you somehow during your formal education.

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Sister-in-law Grace and daughter, Cayley…in a time warp.

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John and Grace

?????????? ?????????? DSC_0131 DSC_0130 ?????????? ?????????? ?????????? Careful documentation and storage, allows for John to access books/records and past editions of astronomy magazines and space program archives with ease.

?????????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????????? DSC_0121 ?????????? ??????????Based on these photographs, can my readers even begin to imagine the stories that were being fired out during the few hours of our visit? Now John and I are phone buddies.  Great morning coffees happen and will happen over chats about the stars.

Finding Florence Lahti

It was a couple of years ago, while visiting my mother and father in Belleville, Ontario that I purchased this book in a second hand shop and was carried away by the small notations in this text book about Canadian history published in 1929.  And so, I wrote this post…

Florence Lahti 1Florence Lahti 2

 

Today, during my flipping of pages on the internet, as well as reading about Atlantis and telescopes, I discovered Florence Lahti’s obituary.  Florence married a Morley Goddard and it seems, remained in Sudbury for her entire life.  She passed away on March 24 of 2008 and predeceased by her brother Victor…his name also appearing in the front of the book.

If any member of the family would like, I will send you this little text of Canadian History so that you might enjoy the doodles and inscriptions and underlined text of your relation.  Just let me know. Not everyone is like me (this makes me laugh) and may consider it a blessing to clear out objects/books and mementos.  It’s just that this seems to me to be a very special book!

Here is Florence’s childhood home, 385 Burton Ave in Sudbury.

387 is the house on the left and 385, the one on the right.

387 is the house on the left and 385, the one on the right.

GODDARD, Florence Lillian (nee Lahti) – With deepest sadness, the
family announces the passing of our cherished Mother and dear friend
Lillian Goddard, 83 years, at the Sudbury Regional Hospital – Memorial
Site, Tuesday, March 24th, 2008. Lil was a voracious reader and had a
passion for solving crossword puzzles. She also enjoyed many nights
with the girls playing bridge. Lil loved the outdoors and was most at
home at the Black Lake and Johnnie Lake Camps. She was in her
element cross-country skiing and playing golf. While raising her three
boys, Lil returned to the workforce as an Executive Assistant to the
President of Cambrian College and Dean of Health Sciences retiring in
1988 after 16 years. Lillian’s greatest joy was spending time with her
family, especially her three grandchildren, who she treasured. Beloved
wife of Morley Goddard predeceased 1972. Loving mother of Morley
(Heather) of Mississauga, Marcus (Jennifer) of Rothesay, N.B. and
Spencer of Toronto. Cherished Grandma Lil of Lauren, Charlotte, and
Spencer. Dear daughter of Victor and Ellen Lahti predeceased. Dear
sister of Victor predeceased (Alyce of Sudbury). Dear aunt of James
(Victoria) of Milford, Jeffrey (Sally) of Field, B.C. and Leslie (Ross) of
Melbourne Australia.

Night Skies and Bats

The evening air was so refreshing tonight and the atmosphere very mystical.  Tree branches were being blown by a bluster of wind.  The sky was still slowly turning from blue to black, with a waxing crescent moon to the southwest.  Stars were visible in each of the windows between the clouds.  With such a bright backdrop, light etched the edges of the surrounding clouds.  In the wide open field I stood, gazing upward, taking it all in.  Every now and then, lightning flashed…but tonight, no bats.

For about a week, I was taking Max out to this open field in the dark of night. My head seemed to be dive-bombed by bats on each of these occasions.  It was so mysterious to me.  Darting away, again and again, I’d hear that distinctive call, and as if to be on roller coasters, they would speed across the navy sky, changing direction at will.  Amazing stuff.  On the first night of this phenomena, I didn’t feel at ease with the experience, but on following nights I took it all in.  Nature provides many gifts if we are present to her.

This short video shows the type of experience I enjoyed.

This next one helps to identify a bat’s sounds.  When there are several around you at once, the sound, of course, is amplified.

I was thinking that, as well as all of the other action we need to take to be good stewards of our communities and the world, we might also make the effort to be conscious of light trespassing…more and more there is a horrendous amount of light pollution.  It would be an awesome thing to do to think about your neighbours and turn off your lights.

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An astronomy update for August can be heard on Calgary Eye-Opener, here.

Art and Connection

The day was a chilly and wet one, but filled to the brim with connecting, whether that was with people or art.

I got Max out in the early morning.  He was in his typically joyful place, leaping through the air in order to retrieve his Chuckit! Paraflight Fetch Toy Frisbee Disc.  He loves it!  It’s durable and I concur with all of the points made in the following review.  I try to alternate his types of work outs each day, taking him out onto trails on his own or doing work outs such as this toy provides.  I call this toy a whizzo…and I pick them up, two at a time, when they are on sale and keep them in stock in my front hall closet.  Max seems to go through about two a year.

While you play this sort of game with your energetic dog, you need to remember to temper the height of your throw in order that your dog does not experience long term wear on his hips and joints.  Border collies are so active, agile and obsessed that they have no limits on what they choose to endure, so you, as an owner, must set the limits.  It is a difficult thing to watch your very active dog succumb to arthritis at some point because you chose to be an ‘over achiever’ with him.  A side note here is that I have developed very beefy arms in my years of training and owning this breed. Certain dogs require hard work every day.  My boy would be one of those.  This work needs to be varied so to remain interesting and so sometimes making your dog sit and stay for 45 minutes is another alternative, particularly on bad weather days.

I dropped Max home and headed to meet with my retired teacher-friends for a coffee.  I treasure these friends so much and felt absolutely blessed as I left yesterday morning.  Our conversation was varied and enthusiastic.  We had opportunity to share both joy and pain and were there for one another to celebrate and support, both.  I continue to be surprised with the human resistance to retirement.  There is so much that happens in the world beyond ‘the job’.  Thanks to my friends for sharing your interesting lives with me.  I am truly blessed by your smarts and your wit.

From there, I jumped on the C Train and got off at the City Hall stop.  After a warm chicken salad sandwich, enjoyed in our central public library, I headed over to the John Clark exhibit at C2.  I found Jeffrey Spalding in an intense conversation with a couple of people and so enjoyed my encounter with the images on my own. I love the synchronicity of the entire event….CTrain City Hall Chicken Salad, Clark, C2…it was a C sort of a morning.

The exhibit is a beautiful collection of works by John Clark.  The collection, available until August 31, is another amazing tribute to a person with a unique statement about his surroundings and experience. I was most emotional in front of a huge canvas painted in 1989, the piece that appears at the complete right of the following photograph.

??????????The following image was acquired via the University of Lethbridge Lasting Images linkArtist-Photographer, Arnaud Maggs, passed in 2012.   May 2013 edition of the Legend. For a look at the full issue in a flipbook format, follow this link.

Arnaud Maggs, John Clark in his studio, 1988. From the University of Lethbridge Art Collection. Gift of the artist, 1989.

Arnaud Maggs, John Clark in his studio, 1988. From the University of Lethbridge Art Collection. Gift of the artist, 1989.

I continue to long for a greater connection with the University of Lethbridge since attending during the years 1973 to 1977, and so I really enjoyed this piece, I believe to be titled Bird and Bridge.

DSC_0256An excellent tribute to John Clark’s life and exploration…beautifully displayed and worth our admiration.  Gratitude to C2 and also the various contributors of the pieces featured in this exhibit.

DSC_0254 ?????????? ?????????? ?????????? ?????????? ??????????From C2, I headed over to the Glenbow Museum to enjoy the Bee Kingdom’s:The Iconoclasts in Glass.  AWESOME!  Get out to see this one.  I have written several times about the Bees over these last several years, but, please DO enjoy this elegant display of a very comprehensive collection of works.  Such a clear vision was evidenced in this body.  A pleasure!  Congratulations and shout out to Phillip, Tim and Ryan!

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Phillip Murray Bandura

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Timothy Belliveau

Timothy Belliveau

Ryan Fairweather

Ryan Fairweather

I hung out in the museum for a little while…thinking especially about Marion Nicholl’s work for some reason.  I thought she was such a phenomenal visionary.  I don’t wish to get into the generational and gender ‘thing’ here…but…come on!

DSC_0266It just wouldn’t be right to be so close to create! at the Golden Age Club, to not walk over and see what was cooking.  I enjoyed a coffee and rice crispy square with visionary and facilitator, Wendy Lees; artists Margaret, Lorna, Jo-Anne and Les and got filled in about all of the recent goings-on including the creation of a Little Library and another zine.

I met up with my daughter after jumping on the train and rockin’ my way to the ‘burbs’ from the core.  After yet another Max-event, Cayley and I met up with a beautiful friend of ours at the Blue’s Can and I spun some circles in the dance floor to the all-so-familiar tunes of Tom Phillips and the Men of Constant Sorrow.  The day could not have been more full, rich and beautiful.

After all of this, I remembered to take the garbage out for a Friday morning pick-up.  And, after reading a few fantastic pages of Carol Shield’s Small Ceremonies (Karen, get this book!), I was off to sleep.

Art Museums

I can hardly keep up with the art exhibits!  Dad and I have been busy this summer.  I have some catching up to do.  The Beaverbrook exhibit at the Glenbow escaped me…slipped right through my finger tips.  I was fortunate that, back in the day, as a recipient of a Teacher Plus award from the Calgary Catholic School District, I traveled Canada, visiting each and every provincial art gallery and the National Art Gallery in Ottawa as well…a single summer immersed in art museums!  During that summer, I spent a great deal of time in The Beaverbrook Art Gallery, enjoying the collection and other works.  It was fun to hear my daughter’s reaction to the experience of standing before the Santiago El Grande (1957) by Salvador Dali, given that I had stood in awe of the piece as a young woman in Fredericton, New Brunswick in the 1990s.  Cayley and I discussed the piece and I pulled out my brochures from the visit…we both wondered about how many people had stood before the piece during its life.  She spoke of a woman who sat beside her and chatted quietly with her about this piece.  Art is so wonderful for its mysteries.  It’s important that we visit art museums.

I drove through Vancouver and missed the Douglas Coupland exhibit.  This is one that I longed to see.  A person could spend their lifetime viewing art, but one has to try to make a balance, especially when life offers so many wonderful things.

Regardless, I’ve got an exhibit on my hit list for today.  It leaves C2 On August 31, so my readers may wish to also stop by to see John Clark’s work.  There’s been some confusion as Calgary has had two galleries merge, with the hope that they will evolve into Contemporary Calgary.  What’s required of the citizens of Calgary is support for a vision that is evolving and likely suffering the pains of transition in many ways.  It can’t be easy.

"The Wheel" (detail), 1986, oil on line, courtesy of the Clark Estate Photo retrieved from FFWD Calgary.

“The Wheel” (detail), 1986, oil on line, courtesy of the Clark Estate Photo retrieved from FFWD Calgary.

John Clark: A Tribute opened about the same time as Dad arrived.  Recently, The Herald published an excellent article about John Clark and his work, an uncommon thing, I find, in Calgary news.  I really wish that the visual arts took up more space in our local papers.  So much is happening.  I guess I have to say that I’m really grateful for FFWD for such as this.  An excellent bit of writing appeared there as well.

Of John Clark, Jeffrey Spalding eloquently states, and this taken directly from the FFWD article linked above…

“John Clark was a seeker: he was somebody who sought enlightenment, sought meaning and sought deeper purpose in things,” says Spalding. “I’m not entirely sure that he found it, and I’m not entirely sure that we’ll find it through his work, but… you’ll find… his desire to try to locate himself in the world and to understand the interaction of himself, nature and culture.”

I think, interesting stuff…enough for me to grab the C train down for a light lunch and a browse.  I hope that my Calgary based readers will take me up on my invitation to stand before these energetic works.  Personally, given my connection with the Lethbridge landscape, I look forward to enjoying Clark’s response to the same.  Tonight I will dish out my thoughts on this special tribute exhibit.

Light on Water

Photo Credit: Kathleen Moors

Photo Credit: © Kathleen Moors

The light is changing…that’s what I noticed as I pulled up to the house just before nine tonight.

Light has a lot to do with how we feel about things.  While I was out on the water with my brother, father and daughter, I enjoyed a different experience of light. The term I used out on the boat was mercurial…something about light bouncing off of water.  I got to thinking about my sister-friend who sails with her partner for a good part of every year.  What a wondrous experience that would be.  Does it all normalize after a time?

I thought that my family was more transparent out on the water…more beautiful; although I wonder how that can be possible.

It was important that I jot this impression/experience down because as time passes, these moments begin to exist in a more distant past.  I never want to forget the silver-white of every moment.

©Kathleen Moors

©Kathleen Moors

 

©Kathleen Moors

©Kathleen Moors

 

© Kathleen Moors

© Kathleen Moors

 

©Kathleen Moors

©Kathleen Moors

 

Gratitude to Cliff’s Chinook Charters.

Alex Colville’s Painting, To Prince Edward Island (1965)

Alex Colville, To Prince Edward Island, painted in 1965

Alex Colville, To Prince Edward Island, painted in 1965

Taking Life, Humanely OR “Should You Bonk ’em On the Head?”

I warned my readers that my posts would be somewhat disconnected, dependent on what comes to mind.  When a person travels OR enjoys a vacation where time is left for reflection, a lot of things can cross the mind.

I was interested in my brother’s response when I turned my head away while my beautiful 15 pound Chinook salmon received three firm and committed bonks on its head.  He asked, “Will you sit down at dinner and eat this fish?  If you will eat this fish, you should be prepared to take its life.”

Hmmmm…

I know my brothers…I know my father…and I knew my Grandfather John Moors before them; all of the men in my family have been fishermen.

Out by a pond on a summer’s day, many years ago, accompanying my Grandfather and my brother, John, I learned a lesson.  John had a grasshopper and was taking its legs off…curiosity? wonder? mystery?…something like that, anyway.  My Grandfather’s response was quick and abrupt and I’ll never forget it.  He taught both my brother and me, in that moment, that it does not matter how small an insect or life form, life is to be respected.  Suffering is to be avoided.  The life of that grasshopper was to be respected above everything in that moment.  At that very instant, my Grandfather took matters into his own hands and in front of us, ended the insect’s life.  And that was the end of the subject.  Nothing was ever said about it again.  But, as children, we were left with a forever-impression that we would never forget.

And this is how my father taught us to regard life also.  After my experience of going out to Kitty Coleman with my brother…and returning home to Calgary, I thought that I would research the matter of how to humanely treat and kill a catch.  It became obvious, based on my reading, that it is a very common practice for squeamish and inexperienced outdoors folk to leave their catch to suffocate in the ice cooler for sometimes as many as six hours and I’ve decided that, for me,  this is ridiculous and unacceptable. An article posted, in part, below, was written for the Spokesman Review April 24, 2013 and summarizes a number of methods;  I feel that my brother is correct in his method and in the manner that he accomplishes it.  I think that if we, as beneficiaries of the planet, have food to enjoy, we need to explore these practices and decide if we can accept them.

Clubbing FishI learned, while out on the water with my brother, that we need to be more conscious about the foods that we eat…how they are produced/processed and try to align our morals, values and sense of our planet before we consume them.  I need to be more aware of the practices and industries that end with my purchase of foods at the grocery store.  Like most contemporaries, I consume foods based on convenience and economics.  This is going to change.

Shout out to my brother of Cliff’s Chinook Charters in Comox, British Columbia…for this and many other lessons, I am grateful.  I bowed my head, in silence and in gratitude, for our catch that day and I pray for their continued bounty.  Beautiful fish of the sea!

15 lb Chinook Salmon...brought in by Kathleen Moors, with a short termed assist by Cliff Moors.  An awesome memory.

15 lb Chinook Salmon…brought in by Kathleen Moors, with a short termed assist by Cliff Moors. An awesome memory.

 

The Stuff of Life: Musical Moments

I have every intention of writing a post here, but, no guarantees. (Three days after writing this introduction, I return to the keyboard.) It’s another ‘hot one’ outside. (As I sit to put the punctuation on this blog post, an entire month and more has gone by.  It is raining outside, with a night time temperature of 13 degrees. I invite my readers to just sit back and enjoy the ride!)  We’ve had a long string of beautiful days and after such a rough winter, is it any wonder that writers step away from their keyboards and artists abandon their studios?  It’s time to make discoveries and later, pull back into the world of studios when  the snow flies and the world is once more, asleep.

I thought I might report on the folk festival daily, but that also failed after Thursday’s reviews, so here I will attempt a sketchy recollection of summer moments and the recent ‘stuff’ of life.

Dad arrived safe and sound, completing another Trans-Canada drive from Ontario and this has been a joy for me; to be able to cook together, eat beautiful foods together and to kiss one another good night before heading for bed.  Our conversations can be interesting and charged with new awareness and revelation OR frustrating and awkward.  We’ve never seen eye-to-eye on several topics and everyone knows it, but I respect no one more than I respect my Dad, for his knowledge, his generosity and his huge conviction. My Dad and I are both religious people and we treasure those discussions.  He knows his scripture and when I share my thoughts about nature, the land and my feelings (both positive and negative), he comes from the same framework and so he inspires me.  Dad loves me and it’s so nice to be on the same red sofa, in the same rooms…the same house…with THAT love.  We are sharing beautiful times.  I love my Dad.

July 27th marked Mom’s second birthday without us, and us without her.  I happened to be down at the folk festival.  Dad was visiting our relations in southern Alberta.  Daughter, Cayley and I melted into the day.  I told her that I didn’t want to be rushing and so I had my first coffee on my back yard deck while watching the birds at the feeder and doing a bit of gardening.  My Mom would have enjoyed all of that.

Sharing a tarp with my children, first we enjoyed Sam Carter.

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I think that one of the most blessed moments of that day was when Matt Patershuk  was emcee at a workshop and decided to end the set with a participatory event that involved the improvisation of You Are My Sunshine, a tune that my mother led our family in singing on so many wonderful road trips.  Mom so enjoyed road trips AND sing songs.  This was a true gift.  There were several really magical moments shared during Folk Festival.

The first concert that I ever attended came after I left Great Falls, Montana and attended University in Lethbridge, Alberta.  The Yates Theater hosted an intimate concert featuring an up-and-comer, Bruce Cockburn.  A young, gangly man, he walked out to center stage, carrying his own wooden stool and an acoustic guitar.  Above him, was hung a mirror ball that came to life during his tune, All the Diamonds in the World.  It was such an amazing concert.  I routinely listened to his early albums on Mark Mehrer’s turn table in my residence.

Yates LethbridgeI enjoyed Bruce Cockburn at both a workshop and an evening concert.  Both experiences were moving as I felt so plugged into the music.

P1180216Nigerian, Seun Kuti, truly rocked the Main Stage on Saturday night.  Cayley and I moved right up to the front row for this…energy…drums…rhythm…voices that were strong and full of conviction.  This was mesmerizing!  Walking to the C Train that night, we felt pulled into the crowd…music connecting all.

Amazing dancers/back up singers!

Amazing dancers/back up singers!

As I continue to jot these musical moments, I am realizing that in no way am I capturing my delight and engagement in these acts.  In fact, I feel that there is no way that I can even list all of the musicians that I discovered this year at folk festival.  I’ll attempt some highlights, beginning with Leonard Sumner of Little Saskatchewan First Nation, Manitoba.  He has evolved to a style that combines a folk/country rhythm with a rap lyric.  I was touched by this young man’s connection to a unique narrative and was impressed by his song writing, a tool to reach others and to encourage healing.  For similar reasons, I enjoyed Nick Sherman of Sioux Lookout, Ontario.

New to me, as well, was The Provincial Archive of our own Edmonton, Alberta.  I enjoyed them at an early workshop on the final day as well as their own stage in the heat of the afternoon.  Nice thing was, they led us in a final tune, a Pete Seeger tribute.  We all joined in singing If I Had a Hammer, a tune that wound up the final performances of every stage all over the grounds that afternoon. Very cool for lots of reasons.

I waited, excited, to hear Matt Andersen on the Main Stage on Sunday Night.  I have enjoyed his music for years.  His guitar playing was fantasmic and his last tune of the night blew us all out of the water…a great ending to a highly successful 2014 Folk Festival.  I guess I’d have to say that I prefer to see Matt take a stage on his own…no back-up, but the Mellotones showed up and really owned the stage along side ‘the man’.

Music…a huge net that captures the stuff of our lives!  Universal. Powerful. Magic.

The Waltz We Were Born For
Walt McDonald, 1934

I never knew them all, just hummed
and thrummed my fingers with the radio,
driving five hundred miles to Austin.
Her arms held all the songs I needed.
Our boots kept time with fiddles
and the charming sobs of blondes,

the whine of steel guitars
sliding us down in deer-hide chairs
when jukebox music was over.
Sad music’s on my mind tonight
in a jet high over Dallas, earphones
on channel five. A lonely singer,

dead, comes back to beg me,
swearing in my ears she’s mine,
rhymes set to music that make
her lies seem true. She’s gone
and others like her, leaving their songs
to haunt us. Letting down through clouds

I know who I’ll find waiting at the gate,
the same woman faithful to my arms
as she was those nights in Austin
when the world seemed like a jukebox,
our boots able to dance forever,
our pockets full of coins.

When One Does Not Keep Up

I suppose we all have something that we want to keep up.  It might be writing in a journal, doing a sketch each day or a painting each week.  For you, is it jogging? Yoga? Weeding the garden? Volunteering? Visiting your Gramma weekly?  ‘Keeping up’ with something/anything is an invented internal pressure; don’t you think? It’s a story we tell ourselves.  Does anyone else want us to keep up?

It’s possible that the concept of keeping up began with the coining of the term, Keeping Up With the Joneses, an idea that had more to do with a person trying to reach a different social status.  We’ve all heard of the t.v. series, Keeping Up With the Kardashians…something else, all together.  If a person scans the internet, they will find a huge number of references to ‘keeping up’ and so more and more I discover that children are over-scheduled during the school year, parents are over-committed, exercise programs lack variety, painting becomes work, diet programs become unhealthy and expensive and society, in general, loses focus on much of the magic that surrounds.

The wonder of minutia disappears because no one can see the ‘ordinary’ when life’s responsibilities get in the way.

What does one do when one does not keep up?

Most on my mind at this very moment is the idea of where to begin my writing after these months away.  I’ve been absent to my blog for the duration of my father’s visit.  It’s been a priority for me to soak up every minute of our time together and in doing so, there are many subjects that I hope, over the next long while, to write about.  Our visit has been a rich and important experience that I will always cherish.  So, where to begin?

Perhaps the idea is to simply begin to write, free of any/all expectations and not concerned with any particular order.  There is something about ‘ordering’ our thoughts, paintings, sketches and writings that makes ‘beginning again’ tricky. The next number of posts will be random explorations.  Each post will be a container, storing small pieces of memory. Why?  Hmmm…well, that’s another question.  I’ve tried to explain to family and friends the why-of-it, this obsession of mine, but with no luck.  For now, I am just following my bliss.

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